Tag Archives: BRT

Pay Attention OKC! “Rethinking How To Assess Public Transit Needs”

Not a KC streetcar

Podcast: Rethinking How To Assess Public Transit Needs | KCUR.

As is often the case, Jarrett Walker talks sense about transit and has some thoughts on streetcar-before-bus systems.  OKC, pay attention!

Via Streetsblog: “CTfastrak takes riders for a spin along bus rapid transit route”

“Officials hope CTfastrak will cut congestion on I-84 and connect communities along the route.”

via CTfastrak takes riders for a spin along bus rapid transit route – News – West Hartford News.

I usually scoff when I see a statement like that because it has rarely been true.  At best, new transit “bends the curve” meaning that while the new facility doesn’t cut congestion along  corridor, it may well slow the rate of growth in congestion.  And that’s a fine thing.

But as I started to post this, I realized that this may now be true.  Why?  It’s in the article itself – VMT has at least leveled and may well be dropping.   The chart below shows what’s going on.

This never happened before.

I really need to find or make a chart like this that goes back to 1945, because this is the first time there has been a sustained leveling of growth since WW2.  And many, many, many facets of urban and transportation planning are predicated on  that growth continuing indefinitely.

Impressive!: “Projected demand for Vancouver’s Broadway subway sees 250,000 trips on first day”

Article: Projected demand for Vancouver’s Broadway subway sees 250,000 trips on first day – The Globe and Mail.

OMG.  250k riders at the start.  Yes, this is the same corridor where Nelson\Nygaard was doing “real-time transit planning”.

Enrique Peñalosa: Why buses represent democracy in action

This guy has what many would think is a radical socialist worldview … but really, it’s about equality.  A bus with 80 passengers should have the right to 80x the road space of a car with a single occupant.

Make sure you pay attention to the effect of automobiles on cities – 0 US automobile deaths in 1900, 7000 US children killed in 1925.